As technologies evolve, companies find new ways to improve their respective businesses. Digital transformation also progressed from being a concept and a mere buzzword to becoming a tangible, successfully utilized business model and work methodology. At the heart of this dynamic tech industry, is the public cloud. Take a look at the latest scoops via Hentsū Weekly Cloud Trends and feel the pulse of the ever-growing cloud computing scene.

IBM Shares Rise on Plans to Spin off its IT Infrastructure Unit and Focus on the Cloud Business

Cloud computing and public cloud just got more exciting and more competitive. The year 2020 has seen a massive shift towards public cloud adoption. In an industry where everyone is increasingly turning their gaze toward the public cloud, IBM revealed its intention to spin off its IT infrastructure unit into "a new publicly traded company.” In short, the aim is to focus their legacy business more on cloud computing. IBM also revealed that it’s going to manage and modernize client-owned infrastructures. This is something the company sees as “a $500 billion market opportunity.” Other technology and solutions which include products from company Red Hat (recently bought by IBM) produced an impressive $5.75 billion in revenue in its second quarter of 2020, surpassing analysts’ forecasts. “We believe we can deliver strong growth within the company with the financial flexibility we will create with this transaction,” CEO Arvind Krishna explained to CNBC’s “Squawk on the Street.” Read the full story at CNBC.

Google Cloud’s Run Rate is Now Over $8B

Traditionally, Google does not divulge crucial financial information regarding its cloud business. However, that tradition changed recently, when the industry giant revealed their cloud business unit boasts a significant $8 billion annual revenue run rate, marking a huge rise from their $4 billion reported back in 2018. The news comes straight from Google CEO Sundar Pichai. While not dominant in the public cloud race, Google is beginning to catch up to its main competitors, Microsoft and AWS. Just to give you a better idea of how things are on the current market, AWS had a run rate of $30 billion during the last quarter, while Microsoft Azure ended up at approximately $11 billion. “Q2 was another strong quarter for Google Cloud, which reached an annual revenue run rate of over $8 billion and continues to grow at a significant pace,” Pichai revealed. “Customers are choosing Google Cloud for a variety of reasons: reliability and uptime are critical. Retailers like Lowe’s are leveraging the cloud as one of the important tools to transform their customer experience and supply chain.” Catch the rest of the story at TechCrunch.

Microsoft Partners Expand the Range of Mission-critical Apps You Can Run on Azure

For years now, Microsoft Azure has been expanding its partner ecosystem. Now, they are enabling thousands of organizations to bring their mission-critical applications to Azure. What this means is in order to meet the market demand, and with an increasing amount of businesses taking the road of digital transformation, more and more solutions are coming to Microsoft’s Azure package. “As a result, the definition of mission-critical applications is evolving and goes well beyond systems of record for many businesses. It’s part of why we never stopped investing across the platform to enable you to increase the availability, security, scalability, and performance of your core applications running on Azure. The expansion of mission-critical apps will only accelerate as AI, IoT, analytics, and new capabilities become more pervasive,” claims MS in a post. Right now, they are going beyond Azure services and capabilities with even more offerings. Find out more, over at MS.

Date/Time

Date(s) - 01/01/1970
12:00 AM - 12:00 AM

Location

600 5th ave. NY, NY
As technology turns more and more towards innovation through cloud computing, machine learning and artificial intelligence. Through various methodologies, companies and businesses are able to adapt and grow despite the otherwise turbulent digital market. This week we see how Google pushes the limits of AI-based tech, Amazon strives to make a mark in the video game streaming market and more. Discover the latest and hottest Weekly Cloud Trends below.

Cloud AI Can Help You Survive the Storm

The waters of today's business scene are murky and relentless. Companies strive to weather the storm through digital transformation, embracing the public cloud and new technologies. Bearing that in mind, diverse innovative tech is flooding the market in the form of cloud-native artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML) services. Businesses are working hard to use these technologies solve incredibly challenging problems. Some of these problems include ending the pandemic. That’s where the power of AI comes into play. Check out the following snippet: You can use pre-packaged AI services and models from major cloud providers to do such things. For example, Google Cloud’s AI-enabled services include:
  • Recommendations AI – To deliver highly personalized product recommendations.
  • Vision AI – To derive insights from images in the cloud.
  • Dialogflow – To build virtual agents and other conversational experiences.
Read more at Forbes.

Oracle’s TikTok and Zoom Deals Won’t Move Cloud Market Share Needle Significantly

The year 2020 has seen a big boost for the cloud infrastructure market, which topped an impressive $30 billion last quarter. Regardless, "Oracle is struggling with market share in the low single digits. It is hoping that the Zoom and TikTok deals can jump start those numbers, but trying to catch the market leaders Amazon, Microsoft and Google, never mind several other companies ahead of it, is going to take a lot more than a couple of brand name customers." “Oracle’s cloud infrastructure services growth has been consistently below overall IaaS and PaaS market growth rates so its market share has [actually] been nudging downward. Zoom may be a good win but it is unlikely to move the needle too much — and remember Zoom  also buys cloud services from AWS,” John Dinsdale, chief analyst at Synergy Research Group, explained. Read the full story at TechCrunch.

Amazon's Luna Cloud Gaming Already Seems Much Different to Google Stadia

Cloud gaming is becoming a huge deal. With the ongoing health crisis, the tech market is making a huge turn towards cloud services and cloud computing in general. It's been a year that Google launched its cloud-based console, Stadia. Now, Amazon is keen to take its own stab at cloud gaming. The recently uncovered Amazon Luna service is going to make a stand on the streaming games market. To sum up, we now have Google Stadia, Microsoft's Game Pass Ultimate, Sony's PlayStation Now and Amazon's Luna, all competing in the games streaming race. Amazon Luna features a controller similar to what Google created for its Stadia console. Luna also has Alexa available on it, and a range of features and apps available. Read the full story at CNet.

Date/Time

Date(s) - 01/01/1970
12:00 AM - 12:00 AM

Location

600 5th ave. NY, NY